Ascended Master Teachings – Chapter I

Chapter 1: The Life and Work of Guy Ballard

Guy Warren Ballard (1878-1939) was an American spiritual leader and the founder of the “I AM” Activity, which is a spiritual movement that emphasizes the existence of ascended masters and their teachings. Ballard’s life and work played a significant role in the development of the Ascended Master Teachings movement, and his teachings continue to influence modern spirituality.

Early Life

Guy Ballard was born on July 28, 1878, in Newton, Kansas, to a family of farmers. He was the second of six children and grew up in a deeply religious household. His mother was a devout Christian who instilled in him a strong sense of faith and spirituality. Ballard’s upbringing would later influence his spiritual beliefs and teachings.

Ballard attended college at the University of Kansas and later moved to Chicago, where he worked as a mining engineer. He married his wife, Edna, in 1908, and the couple had three children. However, Ballard’s life took a significant turn in 1930, when he experienced a series of profound spiritual experiences that would change the course of his life.

Spiritual Experiences

In 1930, while hiking on Mount Shasta in California, Ballard claimed to have a series of spiritual experiences that changed his life. According to his account, he encountered a being known as Saint Germain, who revealed to him the existence of ascended masters and their teachings. Ascended masters are believed to be spiritually advanced beings who have achieved enlightenment and have the ability to guide humanity towards spiritual growth and enlightenment.

Ballard claimed that Saint Germain gave him a series of teachings, which he later compiled into a series of books, including “Unveiled Mysteries” (1934), “The Magic Presence” (1935), and “The ‘I AM’ Discourses” (1939). These teachings formed the basis of the “I AM” Activity, a spiritual movement that emphasized the existence of ascended masters and their teachings.

“I AM” Activity

The “I AM” Activity quickly gained a following, and by the late 1930s, it had become one of the largest spiritual movements in the United States. The movement emphasized the power of positive thinking and the ability of individuals to achieve spiritual growth and enlightenment through their own efforts.

The teachings of the “I AM” Activity also emphasized the existence of ascended masters, who were believed to offer guidance and support to individuals on their spiritual journey. The movement encouraged followers to cultivate a deep connection with these ascended masters and to incorporate their teachings into their daily lives.

Controversy and Legacy

Despite its popularity, the “I AM” Activity was not without controversy. Critics accused Ballard of promoting a cult-like movement and of making false claims about his spiritual experiences. The movement also faced legal challenges, including allegations of fraud and the misuse of funds.

Ballard passed away in 1939, but his legacy continued through the “I AM” Activity and the teachings he left behind. Today, the movement continues to attract followers who seek spiritual growth and enlightenment, and his teachings continue to influence modern spirituality.

Conclusion

Guy Ballard was a significant figure in the development of the Ascended Master Teachings movement. His spiritual experiences and teachings formed the basis of the “I AM” Activity, a spiritual movement that emphasized the existence of ascended masters and their teachings. While his teachings were not without controversy, they continue to influence modern spirituality and inspire individuals seeking spiritual growth and enlightenment.


List of sources for further research:

  1. Ballard, G. (1937). Unveiled Mysteries. Saint Germain Press.
  2. Spalding, B. T. (1924). Life and Teaching of the Masters of the Far East. DeVorss & Company.
  3. Blavatsky, H. P. (1888). The Secret Doctrine. Theosophical Publishing Company.
  4. Bailey, A. A. (1934). Initiation, Human and Solar. Lucis Publishing Company.
  5. Godwin, J. (1994). Theosophy and the New Age. State University of New York Press.
  6. Melton, J. G. (1992). The Encyclopedia of American Religions. Gale Research Inc.
  7. Shepard, L. J. (1988). Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. Gale Research Inc.
  8. Algeo, J. (2009). Theosophy and the Theosophical Society. University of Illinois Press.
  9. Lutyens, M. (1971). Krishnamurti: The Years of Awakening. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  10. Wauters, A. (2001). The Book of Balance and Harmony. Hampton Roads Publishing.